Notes played: C, D, Eb, E, G, A. In this section you will learn how to build, play, practice, and solo with the minor blues scale in a jazz setting, as well as check out a sample solo to help you bring this scale from the page and onto the fretboard in your practice routine. The blues scale is one of the first scales taught to improvisation students, and it usually ends up being the only scale they use besides the major and the pentatonic scale. This step shows the 6 blues scale notes constructed using the minor pentatonic scale of the same key. To understand why these sharp and flat note names have chosen given the note positions from the previous step, have a look at the C major scale. The 2nd and 6th notes of the major scale are not used. This page includes notation/tabs and scale diagrams for each position along the fretboard. These note names are shown below on the treble clef followed by the bass clef. 7. If you already know about the major blues scale and would just like to know how to play it in five positions as well as the open position of C, read on. This step shows the C blues scale on the piano, treble clef and bass clef. The minor blues scale is one of the most versatile scales that you can use in your guitar solos. The flattened 5th is the blue note that gives the blues scale its distinctive sound in this key. The major scale uses the  W-W-H-W-W-W-H  note counting rule to identify the scale note positions. This note Gb is the blue note that gives the blues scale its distinctive sound in this key. The 2nd construction, using the minor pentatonic scale, starts at Lesson 6. The C Major Blues Scale contains the following notes: For a complete lesson on the Major Blues Scale, read this lesson. In a later step, if sharp or flat notes are used, the exact accidental names will be chosen. Great, but now the basic questions arise: where did this scale come from? To flatten a note, just replace it with the piano key lower in pitch ie. This step shows an octave of notes in the key of C, to identify the start and end notes of the scale. The 7th note is the octave of the tonic note, where the pattern begins to repeat itself. The 5th note of the C blues scale is G. 6. For a quick summary of this topic, have a look at Blues scale. Every white or black key could have a flat(b) or sharp(#) accidental name, depending on how that note is used. in C Blues. The blues scale is made from the 1st, flattened 3rd, 4th, flattened 5th, 5th and flattened 7th notes from the major scale above. This step shows the 6 blues scale notes constructed using the major scale of the same key. And what is it for? For the blues scale, the half-step / semitone closeness of notes around the 4th and 5th notes usually mean it is inevitable that a note name will be used twice in the scale, so it makes sense to use the chromatic scale names for all notes. This step assigns note names to the major scale note positions identified in the previous step. The next 3 steps (including this one), show how the natural minor scale is used as a basis for the minor pentatonic scale, which in turn is used to construct the blues scale in this key. The C Major Blues Scale contains the notes C, D, Eb, E, G, A. Yet another (more complex) way to identify the blue note is to take the Diminished 5th note interval based the tonic note - C-dim-5th. There are 6 blues scale notes plus the octave of the tonic note - a total of 7 notes. Here’s how to play the C Major blue scale in the open position. C Major Blues scale on a Piano. So for this major scale, the 5th note of the major scale is flattened from G to Gb to make the blue note. The Solution below shows the C blues scale, on the piano, treble clef and bass clef. To understand why this scale has these sharp and flat note names, have a look at the C natural minor scale. It is fairly easy to finger on the guitar, fun to solo with and a great way to begin playing in a jazz guitar setting. All Rights Reserved. For example, in the Gb blues scale, the 4th note of the major scale Cb is simplified to be note B. The 7th note of the C blues scale is C. Middle C (midi note 60) is shown with an orange line under the 2nd note on the piano diagram. It is essentially a C Major pentatonic scale with an added flat 3. The minor pentatonic scale is made from the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th notes from the natural minor scale above. This step shows the white and black note names on a piano keyboard so that the note names are familiar for later steps, and to show that the note names start repeating themselves after 12 notes. To count up a Half-tone (semitone), count up from the last note up by one physical piano key, either white or black. C Major Blues Scale on the Guitar – 5 CAGED Positions, Tabs and Theory. Below are those notes numbered 1 to 6 on the piano keyboard. The 6th note of the C blues scale is Bb. On the treble clef, Middle C is shown with an orange ledger line below the main 5 staff lines. The audio files below play every note shown on the piano above, so middle C (marked with an orange line at the bottom) is the 2nd note heard. The tonic note (shown as *) is the starting point and is always the 1st note in the major scale. These note names are shown below on the treble clef followed by the bass clef. To count up a Whole tone, count up by two physical piano keys, either white or black. To construct the blues scale from the minor pentatonic scale in the previous step, take the 4th note of that scale(note G), flatten it, and insert it before the 4th note position of the same scale. ©2020 onlineguitarbooks.com. guitar scale: C Blues scale Forget the guess work and use our helpful scale & mode recommendations for each Guitar Backing Track. © 2020 Copyright Veler Ltd, All Rights Reserved. Tagged as: Piano Video. Another way to identify the blue note is to take the 5th note of the natural minor scale from 2 steps above, (which is the same as note 4 as the minor pentatonic scale), and flatten it. C Major Blues scale; 1st 2nd #2nd 3rd – 5th 6th – C: D: D#: E – G: A – This chart highlights the keys of C Blues scale on piano. Wherever possible, complex note names from the major scale are simplified to arrive at the final blues scale notes. The numbered notes are those that might be used when building this note scale. The white keys are named using the alphabetic letters A, B, C, D, E, F, and G, which is a pattern that repeats up the piano keyboard. Here are 5 CAGED shapes for the C Major blues scale. To understand why this scale has these sharp and flat note names, have a look at the C minor pentatonic scale. C major blues scale. Since the key of C appears on the Circle of fifths diagram as both a major and minor key, the Lesson steps explain both ways of constructing this blues scale for this key: The 1st construction, using the major scale, starts at Lesson 3. On the bass clef, Middle C is shown with an orange ledger line above the main 5 staff lines. Having identified the piano keys that make up this major scale, this step shows the note names of those keys. lower down the piano. Middle C (midi note 60) is shown with an orange line under the 2nd note on the piano diagram. This is done because blues (and pentatonic scales) do not follow the 'usual' music theory rules that hold for diatonic scales, such as major and all minor varieties, which state that each note from A..G can only be used once in the scale. This will help you learn how to play melodies and build chords on a piano within the key of C Blues. Note 1 is the tonic note - the starting note - C, and note 13 is the same note name but one octave higher.

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